Saturday, June 15, 2024

News and Ideas Worth Sharing

THEN & NOW: The Glendale Middle Road Bridge

It took four years to rebuild the span with a new concrete bridge when it collapsed in 1974. Locals complained about the lengthy repair time, but it seems that four to five years for bridge replacement is now commonplace in Massachusetts.

The Glendale Middle Road Bridge in Stockbridge has experienced a bit of bad luck over the past 50 years. But first, let’s go back to an earlier time. The bridge illustration shown above was published in 1890. Color arrows have been added as reference points. The red arrow points to a slightly distorted view of the parabolic truss or “pumpkin-seed-style” structure built by the Berlin Iron Bridge Company. A blue arrow points to the Glendale Woolen Mill on the left, which was torn down several years after this illustration was first printed. A green arrow points to a modest train depot that once stood just to the right of the bridge.

Shown immediately below this text are two early 1900s images of the old bridge. It survived until 1974 when a speeding auto crashed into it. The collapsed bridge is shown in two additional photos below. It took four years to rebuild the span with a new concrete bridge. Locals complained about the lengthy repair time, but it seems that four to five years for bridge replacement is now commonplace in Massachusetts. Now, a mere 46 years later, the “new” bridge has two supporting beams in poor condition and has been reduced to one lane as shown in the bottom photograph.

THEN: The Glendale Bridge circa 1909. Photo courtesy of Gary Leveille.
THEN: The Glendale Bridge in the early 1900s. Photo courtesy of Gary Leveille.
THEN: The Glendale Bridge was destroyed in 1974 when it was struck by a speeding car. Photo by Stanley Magdalenski.
THEN: A close-up view of the collapsed bridge. Photo by Stanley Magdalenski.
NOW: The present-day concrete bridge has been reduced to one lane. Photo by Gary Leveille.

Get Daily Updates From The Berkshire Edge!

spot_img

The Edge Is Free To Read.

But Not To Produce.

Continue reading

BITS & BYTES: Carrie Haddad at Olana; Pittsfield Public Schools and the Berkshire County NAACP present ‘Till’; Ice Yacht talk at the Stockbridge Library;...

Inspired by Frederic Church’s own relationship with the art market, this informal conversation will examine how art and commerce shape the way artists relate to their work and their environments.

BITS & BYTES: ‘Mississippi Masala’ and ‘Koyaanisqatsi’ at Hudson Hall; BIFF presents ‘Lady Bird’; Triplex and GBPT ‘Freud’s Last Session’ fundraiser; ‘Out of Exile’...

Winner of Best Screenplay and Audience Award for Best Film at the Venice Film Festival, director Mira Nair’s “Mississippi Masala” is a luminous look at the complexities of love in the melting pot of the Deep South.

The Edge Is Free To Read.

But Not To Produce.